There’s no real clear-cut way to classify job interview questions. One can classify them based on the parts of the interview or one can also do it by the function of the question. Another way is to classify the questions based on the information they seek to illicit. You may consider this as a  mix of question types with the rationale behind them.

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Let’s say that your resume has won you the next step of the application process, what now? Companies would have various ways of how to go about their hiring. Some companies would just require an interview after shortlisting candidates based on resumes. A growing number subject their applicants to tests (written, practical, and even oral) and technical interviews. Still, no matter what other steps companies have their applicants go through, the job interview is one of the inevitable steps before they hire a candidate.

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One of the most overlooked parts of the resume is the cover letter. Plenty of job hunters simply forgo drafting a cover letter and go with the idea that the resume “speaks for itself.” But should this be the case?

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Now, after discussing what details should be placed in your resume, let’s go over the details that you should avoid. Believe it or not, there are plenty of details that may create issues for you with your reader.

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Your resume can be presented in various formats depending on what you’d like to be foregrounded. Here are the most common resume formats and how they are often used.

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When providing your professional history and credentials in your resume, you need not pack it with all of the things you’ve done since your teacher praised you in kindergarten. Mentioning a Grade 1 piano recital isn’t really critical for a junior software engineer position for a business solutions company. Such details only distract the reader from the more relevant requirements for the position. Here are some of the more important details that you’d want to highlight.

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In your resume, your responsibilities and accomplishments should be phrased using action-benefit statements. The premise is: for every action you’ve made, there should be a resulting benefit for someone (preferably the organization for which you’ve worked.

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While conventional wisdom in business writing dictates that you should keep words simple to promote understanding, there are times when you might need words that carry a degree of oomph in them. In your resume for example. You don’t want to communicate mediocrity.

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For the longest time, I’ve seen applicants with an objective section that is so plain and boring. Such weak openings to resumes often cost  these applicants the battle for the positions.

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For all practical purposes, your resume is a document that presents you as the candidate for the position. It should have the primary objective of landing you the next step in the application process.

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